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Outer Banks Restaurant Guide Home Page

Back Porch Restaurant sign

Please choose an Outer Banks Restaurant Guide from the list below

Avon
Buxton
Corolla
Duck
Frisco
Hatteras
Kill Devil Hills
Kitty Hawk
Manteo
Nags Head
Ocracoke
Rodanthe
Southern Shores
Waves

The Outer Banks offers a wide range of experiences, which definitely include dining. Examine any Outer Banks restaurant guide and you will find a myriad of restaurants, and a myriad of cuisines. Sure, caught-just-this-morning seafood is available from the fresh waters of the Sounds and from the ocean waters of the Gulfstream. From Corolla to Ocracoke, diners can feast on tuna, mahi-mahi, mako shark, king mackerel, flounder, and striped bass, plus shellfish such as shrimp, soft-shell crabs, and oysters. Seafood, however, is just the beginning.

In addition to the fresh catch of the day, diners will also be treated to the fresh locally grown crops. Produce and herbs are farmed on the islands and on the nearby mainland. Fresh Silver Queen sweet corn, red bliss potatoes, sun-ripened tomatoes, and green beans find their way to restaurant kitchens daily. Fresh melons, peaches, and figs are available, too, as are herbs such as dill, thyme, and rosemary. Peanuts are harvested locally, and because the Outer Banks belongs to North Carolina, which borders Virginia, tasty Virginia hams are a part of many menus.

These fresh items are utilized in all the cuisines offered on the island, including seafood, Mexican, Mediterranean, Chinese, Caribbean, American (including steaks and barbecue), French, Italian, and Japanese. Visitors can dine on-site, order take-out or drive through. Family-friendly restaurants abound and include such favorites as pizza, hamburgers, and ice cream.

Owen's Restaurant Clearly, an Outer Banks restaurant guide includes a long list of dining choices. A recent addition to that guide is an extensive selection of wines. Over the past few years, wine has become more and more popular on the islands, and restaurants are continually adding new bottles to their wine list. A few restaurants on the north end of the Outer Banks carry as many as 100 different varieties of wine, and have received awards for their selections. Mixed drinks are offered in several restaurants, but there are restrictions regarding which places may serve hard liquor. Establishments in Southern Shores, Colington, Hatteras, and Ocracoke are only allowed to serve beer and wine. Restaurants in other towns and villages may allow the diner to brown bag it (bring his or her own bottle). Before choosing a place to dine, it would be wise to call the restaurant to ascertain its liquor policies.

Dining in the Outer Banks, for the most part is fairly casual, particularly on Hatteras Island, where the ambience is laid-back and the dress code is the basic "shirt and shoes required." There are, however, some very upscale and elegant establishments. For instance, in Duck, one restaurant specifies "jackets required for the gentlemen." Other establishments are quite formal and offer luxurious meals in luxurious settings.

These upscale and luxurious establishments often require a reservation, but many of the Outer Banks restaurants do not. Most cafes accept drop-ins and walk-ups with no problem, except in the summertime. During summertime (high season) all of the restaurants are extremely busy. Making a reservation or at least calling ahead can aid in getting seated. A couple of restaurants in Duck not only require reservations, but also recommend calling at least three days ahead, because they book up so quickly.

Visitors dining out in a large group should always call ahead. Some restaurants can easily handle large parties. Some have neither the room, nor the staff. Calling ahead will determine if the restaurant can accommodate the group, and will also give the staff time to prepare.

The majority of Outer Banks restaurants operate only in the summer during the high season. The shoulder seasons of spring and fall, however, are becoming more and more popular for visitors, so more restaurants are opening sooner and staying open longer. Some establishments open for business as early as March and remain open as long as Thanksgiving. A handful will reopen during the winter for the holiday season, too, but few establishments have enough business to stay open all year. For those who enjoy visiting the islands, especially in the off-season, it would be wise to determine ahead of time which restaurants will be open for business.

Please choose an Outer Banks Restaurant Guide from the list below


Avon
Buxton
Corolla
Duck
Frisco
Hatteras
Kill Devil Hills
Kitty Hawk
Manteo
Nags Head
Ocracoke
Rodanthe
Southern Shores
Waves

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